Overview: What is Inclusion?

What is Inclusion?

inclusionInclusion means that your child is able to be a part of a preschool that includes children with and without disabilities and special needs. The law guarantees that all children have access to a free, appropriate public education (FAPE) in the least restrictive Environment (LRE), and that means evaluating the general education classrooms to determine if the environment supports your child’s educational needs.

Some children will benefit greatly from being included with typically developing peers. It offers them the opportunity to have peers who will model age appropriate behaviors and skills. Inclusion also emphasizes an acceptance of your child as a child, without focusing on his or her disabilities. Your child learns by participating in all parts of school life rather than being separated based on needs caused by his or her limitations.

inclusionInclusion means that your child is able to be a part of a preschool that includes children with and without disabilities and special needs. The law guarantees that all children have access to a free, appropriate public education (FAPE) in the least restrictive Environment (LRE), and that means evaluating the general education classrooms to determine if the environment supports your child’s educational needs.

Some children will benefit greatly from being included with typically developing peers. It offers them the opportunity to have peers who will model age appropriate behaviors and skills. Inclusion also emphasizes an acceptance of your child as a child, without focusing on his or her disabilities. Your child learns by participating in all parts of school life rather than being separated based on needs caused by his or her limitations.

inclusion-2The alternative to an inclusive classroom is a dedicated special education day class, where the entire classroom is comprised of children with special needs and disabilities with a special education teacher leading the class often with aides assisting students either 1:1 or in small groups. This setting can also be an appropriate setting for children in need of more assistance and support. When visiting classrooms, ask the teacher or special education director if there are opportunities for inclusion in the special education day classes; some classes will join general education classes in the library or during recess or other scheduled times so opportunities for peer modeling and interaction with their typically developing peers are present.

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