SOCIAL/EMOTIONAL: Links & Resources

Self Regulation / Mutual Regulation

Resources for Parents:

Brazelton, T.B. (1992) Touchpoints: Your Child’s Emotional and Behavioral Development, Development, Birth to 3—The Essential Reference for the Early Years. Cambridge, MA: Perseus Books

Fraiberg, S. H. (1959, 1996) The Magic Years: Understanding and Handling the Problems of Early Childhood. New York: Fireside Books.

Lerner, C. et al. (2000) Learning & Growing Together: Understanding Your Child’s Development. Washington, D.C.: ZERO TO THREE Press.

Lieberman, A.F. (1993) The Emotional Life of the Toddler. New York: The Free Press, a Division of Simon & Schuster, Inc.

Parkian, R. and Seibel, N. L. (2002) Building Strong Foundations: Practical Guidance for Promoting the Social/Emotional Development of Infants and Toddlers. Washington, D.C.: ZERO TO THREE Press.

www.zerotothree.org.
ZREO TO THREE is a rich and informative website with valuable materials, articles, and books for parents and professionals on all aspects of early development; includes online bookstore with many wonderful resources.

Resources for Children:

Bang, M. (2004) When Sophie Gets Angry — Really, Really Angry… New York: Scholastic, Inc.

Curtis, J. L. (2002) I’m Gonna Like Me: Letting Off a Little Self-Esteem. New York: Harper Collins.

Curtis, J. L. (1998) Today I Feel Silly & Other Moods That Make My Day. New York: Harper Collins.

Viorst, J. (1987) Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day. New York: Aladdin.

Behavior / Discipline

Resources:

http://www.preventiveoz.org
The Preventive Ounce’s information on understanding temperament in children

http://www.zerotothree.org/site/PageServer?pagename=key_temp
Zero to Three’s information on temperament and behavior

http://extension.missouri.edu/xplor/hesguide/humanrel/gh6119.htm
University of Missouri primer on guidance

http://www.talaris.org/spotlight_testing123.htm
Talaris video resources on guidance and discipline

http://ohioline.osu.edu/hyg-fact/5000/5195.html
Ohio State University’s fact sheet on teaching children to resolve conflict

Resources for Professionals:

http://www.aboutourkids.org/
The New York University Child Study Center (CSC) information on guidance and discipline

http://cehd.umn.edu/ceed/projects/
University of Minnesota’s Center for Early Education and Development Project information on Social and Emotional Development and Mental Health

Attachment & Relationships

Brazelton, T.B. (1992) Touchpoints: Your Child’s Emotional and Behavioral Development. Boston: Addison-Wesley. (A wonderful, general reference book that covers many topics related to your child’s social and emotional development.)

Lerner, C. and Dombro, A.L. (2000) Learning & Growing Together: Understanding Your Child’s Development. Washington, D.C.: ZERO TO THREE. (A short, easy-to-read book that talks about the first three years and the impact of the parent-child relationship on all areas of a child’s development.)

Lieberman, Alicia (1993) The Emotional Life of the Toddler. New York: Simon and Schuster, Inc. (A must-read for parents of toddlers, or soon to be toddlers filled with wonderful stories and valuable information.)

Social & Emotional

These websites provide information about various therapy approaches:

The Interdisciplinary Council on Developmental and Learning Disorders (ICDL)
http://www.icdl.com/dirFloortime/overview/index.shtml
The ICDL website provides information about the Developmental, Individual Difference, Relationship-based (DIR®/Floortime™) Model. This is a framework that helps clinicians, parents, and educators conduct a comprehensive assessment and develop an intervention program tailored to the unique challenges and strengths of children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) and other developmental challenges.

Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT)
http://pcit.phhp.ufl.edu/
PCIT is a treatment for conduct-disordered young children that places emphasis on improving the quality of the parent-child relationship and changing parent-child interaction patterns. In PCIT, parents are taught specific skills to establish a nurturing and secure relationship with their child while increasing their child’s prosocial behavior and decreasing negative behavior.

SAMHSA Health Information Network
http://mentalhealth.samhsa.gov/publications/allpubs/KEN02-0133/infant.asp
The Infant Parent Program (IPP) is a specialty mental health program serving infants, toddlers and their families through San Francisco General Hospital. Relationships between parents and children are the focus of treatment. IPP provides infant-parent services to families in distress through weekly in-home visits. IPP’s approach includes concrete assistance, emotional support, developmental guidance, and psychotherapy.

Association for Play Therapy
http://www.a4pt.org/ps.playtherapy.cfm?ID=1653
Play therapy is a structured, theoretically based approach to therapy that builds on the normal communicative and learning processes of children. The Association for Play Therapy (APT) is a national professional society with headquarters in Clovis, California.

These books about therapy are for children ages 4–8:

Nemiroff, M. and Annuziata, J. (1990) A Child’s First Book About Play Therapy. Washington, DC: Magination Press, American Psychological Association (APA).

Rashkin, R. and Adamson, B. (2005) Feeling Better: A Kid’s Book About Therapy. Washington, DC: Magination Press, American Psychological Association (APA).

Galvin, M. (1988) Ignatius Finds Help: A Story About Psychotherapy for Children. Washington, DC: Magination Press, American Psychological Association (APA).

Parent Support

http://www.cde.ca.gov/ls/fa/yr/guide.asp
Benefits of Year Round Education

http://www.ucp.org/
United Cerebral Palsy Association

http://www.nichcy.org/informationresources/pages/camps.aspx
NICHCY website with links to summer camps and programs for children with special needs

http://narha.org/
Website of the North American Riding for the Handicapped Association

http://www.atri.org/index.html
Website for the Aquatic Therapy and Rehab Institute

 

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